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can see a hair floating wildly in the anti-gravity environment. she choked up as she spoke of the enormity of the work that she and her fellow astronauts do up there. take a listen. >> we are honored to be fulfilling that dream and living that dream right now. so i just wonder what is going to happen -- or what our future has in store for us, 10 years, 25 years, 50 years and 100 years from now. >> reporter: incredible shot there. she handed it off. they return to us at 8:53 with a russian and a japanese astronaut. they have had a busy motion to fix a radiator leak, the docking of the dragon, the first cargo craft to visit the international space station and they have been part of human scientific tests. to cap it off, they had a close call with a chunk of space debris on friday. the crew had to be ready to scramble to the life boat, while the debris drifted within two moyl miles of them. in space, that's really, really close. a big sigh of relief from the career. back to you. >> shannon: highly technical work. those are brave folk, bringing back the information to help us w
impacts on you. this is whole different environment and we can not let the republicans say, hey, if we could just hide this. i don't want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> picking up on that, ann, did you see that in your research, when the message developments reach out to women you had to integrate these ideas of social and economic messages that they are part of a basket of issues that affect women's lives? >> they were part of a basket. i think what is important when we were targeting these independent voters in battleground states, these women were reacting very much to the same messages that most voters were reacting to. i think, when we're talking getting more women into the pipeline, we want to go back to the, i think the big story of this campaign, and recruiting and getting more women involved and sort of really waking up to that independent female voter votes who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking of possibly running and which party they might align with. one of the things when you talk to women candidates
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> erin burnett is going out front tonight with someone who knows jill kelley personally. >> yes, and has known her for a long time. he is the publisher of "tampa bay magazine." he knows her well and i think his view of her is different than what some have heard, but we'll ask what kind of woman she really is, why she was so close to all of these military officers. and we'll be talking about the fbi investigation and if the president really answered the question today when he put the blame on the fbi, and he said he was frustrated that he was not told for six months. and the war of words, wolf, which was so interesting to watc
tax, it forces us to shut down ranches and farms. it's not good for the environment and future generations and americans in general. reporter: he paid the irs $2 million when he inherited the ranch more than two decades ago. at this point, his children will have to pay $13 million. reporter: that will jump to 52 million estates who will be affected by this. farmers say it hurts them because all their money is in the dirt and not in their pocket. jon: the fact he pay taxes on your life and that he pay them again when you die, it's a great system thank you well, we finally seeing some compromise between capitol hill and the white house? details of what takes place at that meeting between the president and congressional leaders. is there some agreement here somewhere? jenna: plus, we are watching the volatile situation between israel and hamas militants. day three of airstrikes. israel is wondering if there is a ground assault on the way. we have answers ahead. [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink cast
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
are being formed today in an environment that's much, much more radical than was the case nearly a decade earlier. i think there are some important lessons that the u.s. can learn from iraq and from afghanistan and from what's taking place there. but again the thing i would take away and the thing i would really stress to people is that this is not a war that the u.s. can win on its own. it's very -- it's very tempting for the u.s. to see a problem and to want to go in and solve it all the way. and i think there has to be a realization that sometimes being so pro active and carrying out so -- proactive and carrying out so many missile strikes and drone strikes can actually have a negative impact. >> ibrahim, did you want to chime in on this one? >> well, i didn't hear the question. i have a hard time hearing from the audience. but what greg said made sense to me so thank you. [laughter] >> i'm sorry. i'll start repeating the question to make sure we can get it. >> thank you. >> in the back. >> thank you. good morning. my name is giancarlo gonzalez with talk radio service. yemeni president
sway? guest: i think it does. he won as an independent. host: environment, public works are among the committee's senators sanders sits on. he was the mayor of burlington. gloria from texas. caller: good morning. can used to that chart that you showed earlier about what they would be paying in taxes? host: we will get the ready for you. did it concern you? caller: everybody is talking out devastating it will be to go over the cliff. people making under $20,000, $7.50 a week. there is only $270 a week. i didn't think the country will be devastated if those tax rates become effective. president obama did get a mandate to implement the taxes. he won over 2.9% of the popular vote. that is a greater percentage, not counting bush, who did not win the popular vote. host: this comes from the tax policy center and shows with the tax increases could be. guest: that is a significant tax increase and we have to avoid it. the president has urged and i support -- let's vote today on making sure that the bottom 98% of taxpayers in this country, people up to $250,000, we will make sure they will
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> hard rock international is teaming up with yoko ono. and why hunger for the imagine there's no hunger campaign. horn $4.5 would million has been raised during the past five years and the president and ce off of the hard rock cafe has been very involved in this. tell us a little bit it. >> thanks for having me. this is a ram we've beprogram w running for many years. there are a billion people beneath poverty and hunger level in the world. and the program really is a program that enjoins why hunger, yoko ono and ourselves and we encourage our staff and our customers to basically provide funding around this holiday season so that we can divert the -- >> so if i eat at a cafe or one of your
cancer when it is stage one and , that has a lotcommo of economics. this is a different environment, and we should not let the republicans say, we can just hide this. i do not want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> when you see the message on how to integrate these ideas that they are part of the issues s?at affect your live specimen >> when we were targeting battleground states, these women were reacting to what voters were reacting to. when we are talking about getting more and women into the pipeline, i want to go back to the big story of this campaign and recruiting and getting more women involved and waking up that independent voter, who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking about running and which party they might align with the reagan -- they might align with. one thing we talked about is the amount of money spent on these campaigns that paralyzes the candidates, because they look at it like, how can i even take that on? part of these independent female voters. >> turning out women, i think this was not just a
are working hard every day against a very challenging market and environment. we have a solid reform in the farm bill in terms of setting up a risk insurance plan for the first time in american history. have full support from the dairy industry and dairy providers. lots of compromise and negotiation. again, a $23 billion reduction to the deficit in terms of last -- the last farm bill. that was done on june 19. since then the house leadership has refused to bring a farm bill to the floor despite the fact that the house agriculture committee, which i sit on, actually passed a bipartisan measure, so it was teed up and ready for action here on the house floor. and yet we have gone five months since the senate acted. we have seven weeks of recess prior to this past tuesday. we have american farmers who are sitting out there trying to figure out what on earth is going to be the future in terms of their production and their businesses. and as i said, if you look at the one example of milk, without having a farm bill in place on january 1, we are going to see basically the price of milk spin
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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